New, free, database of tribal court appellate opinions from Northwest Intertribal Court System

NICS LogoThe Northwest Intertribal Court System (NICS) recently launched a free, searchable database of hundreds of hundreds of tribal court appellate opinions from 30 Indian tribes in the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, and Northern California.

The courts included in this resource are:

Burns Paiute Tribal Court Of Appeals
Chehalis Tribal Court Of Appeals
Confederated Salish And Kootenai Tribal Court Of Appeals
Hoh Tribal Court Of Appeals
Hoopa Valley Tribal Court Of Appeals
Kalispel Tribal Court Of Appeals
Klamath Supreme Court
Kootenai Tribal Court Of Appeals
Lower Elwha Klallam Tribal Court Of Appeals
Lummi Tribal Court Of Appeals
Metlakatla Indian Community
Muckleshoot Tribal Court Of Appeals
Nez Perce Tribal Court Of Appeals
Nisqually Tribal Court Of Appeals
Nooksack Tribal Court Of Appeals
Port Gamble S’klallam Tribal Court Of Appeals
Puyallup Tribal Court Of Appeals
Quileute Tribal Court Of Appeals
Samish Indian Nation
Sauk-Suiattle Tribal Court Of Appeals
Shoalwater Bay Tribal Court Of Appeals
Shoshone-Bannock Tribal Court Of Appeals
Skokomish Tribal Court Of Appeals
Spokane Tribal Court Of Appeals
Squaxin Island Tribal Court Of Appeals
Suquamish Tribal Court Of Appeals
Swinomish Tribal Court Of Appeals
Tulalip Tribal Court Of Appeals
Upper Skagit Tribal Court Of Appeals
Yurok Tribal Court Of Appeals

Legal scholars, judges, and tribal law practitioners throughout the U.S. as well as the general public will benefit from having this access to these opinions.

Oklahoma Tribal College To Get Federal Funds | KGOU

College of Muscogee NationThe U.S. Bureau of Indian Education has authorized funding for the College of the Muscogee Nation in Okmulgee, OK.

The college sought funding in April as a tribal college under the Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities Assistance Act of 1978. Approval was announced Wednesday by Kevin Washburn, the assistant secretary for Indian Affairs with the U.S. Department of the Interior. Funding is to begin in July.

The college was founded in 2004 to meet the Muscogee (Creek) Nation citizens’ need for quality higher education that also embodies tribal culture, language and history. Its primary source of funding is the Muscogee Nation.

The College awards associate degrees in gaming, Native American studies, police science and tribal services. It offers two certificate programs in gaming and tribal language studies.

Oklahoma Tribal College To Get Federal Funds | KGOU.

Who Decides You’re Real? Fixing the Federal Recognition Process – Jan 16 &17, 2014

From Arizona State University:

The U.S. government officially recognizes 566 Native American tribes. These communities have certain legal, regulatory and financial rights and privileges that non-recognized communities do not. But the recognition process has been controversial, slow and inconsistent, with many tribes saying they are unfairly left out in the cold.

The Indian Legal Clinic at the Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law at Arizona State University recently conducted the first comprehensive survey of unrecognized tribes. At the same time, the U.S. Department of the Interior has announced that it will propose new regulations in an effort to improve the federal recognition process.

This conference will focus on the history of federal recognition, current issues with recognition, the administrative criteria, proposed changes to the federal acknowledgment process, and the results of the Clinic’s survey.

It will bring together tribal leadership and members, consultants who have assisted unrecognized tribes in establishing and exercising rights, and other interested people to discuss challenges faced by unrecognized tribes. Attendees will participate in sessions that focus on identifying obstacles and proposing solutions to the current recognition framework.

Register Here!

Or, to follow the conference via webcast, use the links below.

Day 1

http://mediasite.law.asu.edu/media/Viewer/?peid=824c4937ac504f03abf9fe96c2757d811d

 

Day 2

http://mediasite.law.asu.edu/media/Viewer/?peid=5259d9e8127e421fa3e24b245f231e3c1d

AIHEC Annual Winter Meeting, February 10-13, 2014

The AIHEC annual Winter Meeting & Capitol Hill Days will be held February 10-13, 2014 in Washington D.C.

We have an exciting four days of activities and meetings planned, so please register today if you have not already done so- and be sure to bring along a few students, board members, staff/faculty, if you are able.  If possible, please include in your institution’s group a student who can share a story about your LAND-GRANT program – whether a research project, community garden, or other land grant activity relevant/impactful to your community.  For states with multiple TCUs, each school does not need to bring a land grant student, but if you have an exemplary student who can share his or her land grant story succinctly and compellingly, please try to bring that student if you can.  We will be highlighting land grant funding inequities during our meetings, and it would be great if at least one student per visit could share a specific land grant story.

AIHEC Winter 2014 Meeting & Capitol Hill Days
February 10-13, 2014 (Travel: Feb. 9 and LATE on Feb. 13 or Feb. 14)
Liaison Capitol Hill Hotel
415 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC
 

Registration:  Please regiser HERE. One person from your institution can register the whole group.  However, please note that AIHEC is asking for the home zip code of each STUDENT participant:

This is very important, as we may be able to schedule additional delegation meetings for students whose homes are in a different Congressional district or state.  Having this information will greatly enhance our efforts to broaden our base of support, so please be sure to include student zip codes! 

Facts for Features: American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month

From Census.gov

American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month: November 2013

The first American Indian Day was celebrated in May 1916 in New York. Red Fox James, a Blackfeet Indian, rode horseback from state to state, getting endorsements from 24 state governments, to have a day to honor American Indians. In 1990, President George H.W. Bush signed a joint congressional resolution designating November 1990 as “National American Indian Heritage Month.” Similar proclamations have been issued every year since 1994. This Facts for Features presents statistics for American Indians and Alaska Natives, as this is one of the six major race categories.

Note: Unless otherwise specified, the statistics in the “Population” section refer to the population who reported a race alone or in combination with one or more other races.

Population

5.2 million
The nation’s population of American Indians and Alaska Natives, including those of more than one race. They made up about 2 percent of the total population in 2012. Of this total, about 49 percent were American Indian and Alaska Native only, and about 51 percent were American Indian and Alaska Native in combination with one or more other races.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

11.2 million
The projected population of American Indians and Alaska Natives, alone or in combination, on July 1, 2060. They would comprise 2.7 percent of the total population.
Source: Population projections

437,339
The American Indian and Alaska Native population, alone or in combination 65 and over.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

14
Number of states with more than 100,000 American Indian and Alaska Native residents, alone or in combination, in 2012. These states were California, Oklahoma, Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, Washington, New York, North Carolina, Florida, Alaska, Michigan, Oregon, Colorado and Minnesota.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

19.6%
The proportion of Alaska’s population identified as American Indian and Alaska Native, alone or in combination, in 2012, the highest rate for this race group of any state. Alaska was followed by Oklahoma (13.4 percent), New Mexico (10.4), South Dakota (10.0 percent) and Montana (8.1 percent).
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

31.0
Median age for those who were American Indian and Alaska Native, alone or in combination, in 2012. This compares with a median age of 37.4 for the U.S. population as a whole.
Sources: 2012 American Community Survey

Reservations

325
Number of federally recognized American Indian reservations in 2012. All in all, excluding Hawaiian Home Lands, there are 618 American Indian and Alaska Native legal and statistical areas for which the Census Bureau provides statistics.
Source: Census Bureau Geography Division

22%
Percentage of American Indians and Alaska Natives, alone or in combination, who lived in American Indian areas or Alaska Native Village Statistical Areas in 2010. These American Indian areas include federal American Indian reservations and/or off-reservation trust lands, Oklahoma tribal statistical areas, tribal designated statistical areas, state American Indian reservations, and state designated American Indian statistical areas.
Source: 2010 Census Summary File 1

Tribes

566
Number of federally recognized Indian tribes.
Data courtesy of the Bureau of Indian Affairs

Families

1,122,043
The number of American Indian and Alaska Native family households in 2012 (households with a householder who was American Indian and Alaska Native alone or in combination with another race). Of these, 54.7 percent were married-couple families, including those with children.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

6.2%
The percentage of American Indian and Alaska Natives alone or in combination with other races who were grandparents living with their grandchild(ren) in 2012.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

Housing

54.0%
The percentage of single-race American Indian and Alaska Native householders who owned their own home in 2012. This is compared with 63.9 percent of the overall population.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

Languages

20.4%
Percentage of American Indians and Alaska Natives alone or in combination 5 years and older who spoke a language other than English at home in 2012, compared with 21 percent for the nation as a whole.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

Education

78.8%
The percentage of single-race American Indians and Alaska Natives 25 and older who had at least a high school diploma, GED certificate or alternative credential in 2012. In addition, 13.5 percent obtained a bachelor’s degree or higher. In comparison, 86.4 percent of the overall population had a high school diploma and 29.1 percent had a bachelor’s degree or higher.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

40.9%
Single-race American Indians and Alaska Natives 25 and older whose bachelor’s degree was in science and engineering, or science and engineering-related fields in 2012. This compares with 43.6 percent for all people 25 and older with this level of education.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

70,532
Number of single-race American Indians and Alaska Natives 25 and older who had a graduate or professional degree in 2012.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

Jobs

26.1%
The percentage of civilian-employed single-race American Indian and Alaska Native people 16 and older who worked in management, business, science and arts occupations in 2012. In addition, 25.1 percent worked in service occupations and 22.8 percent in sales and office occupations.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

Veterans

161,686
The number of single-race American Indian and Alaska Native veterans of the U.S. armed forces in 2012.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

Income and Poverty

$35,310
The median household income of single-race American Indian and Alaska Native households in 2012. This compares with $51,371 for the nation as a whole.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

29.1%
The percent of single-race American Indians and Alaska Natives that were in poverty in 2012, the highest rate of any race group. For the nation as a whole, the poverty rate was 15.9 percent.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

Health Insurance

27.4%
The percentage of single-race American Indians and Alaska Natives who lacked health insurance coverage in 2012. For the nation as a whole, the corresponding percentage was 14.8 percent.
Source: 2012 American Community Survey

Following is a list of observances typically covered by the Census Bureau’s Facts for Features series:

African-American History Month (February)
Super Bowl
Valentine’s Day (Feb. 14)
Women’s History Month (March)
Irish-American Heritage Month (March)/
St. Patrick’s Day (March 17)
Earth Day (April 22)
Asian/Pacific American Heritage Month (May)
Older Americans Month (May)
Cinco de Mayo (May 5)
Mother’s Day
Hurricane Season Begins (June 1)
Father’s Day

The Fourth of July (July 4)
Anniversary of Americans With Disabilities Act (July 26)
Back to School (August)
Labor Day
Grandparents Day
Hispanic Heritage Month (Sept. 15-Oct. 15)
Unmarried and Single Americans Week
Halloween (Oct. 31)
American Indian/Alaska Native Heritage Month (November)
Veterans Day (Nov. 11)
Thanksgiving Day
The Holiday Season (December)

Editor’s note: The preceding data were collected from a variety of sources and may be subject to sampling variability and other sources of error. Facts for Features are customarily released about two months before an observance in order to accommodate magazine production timelines. Questions or comments should be directed to the Census Bureau’s Public Information Office: telephone: 301-763-3030; fax: 301-763-3762; or e-mail: <PIO@census.gov>.
Facts for Features: American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month: November 2013 – Facts for Features & Special Editions – Newsroom – U.S. Census Bureau.

Grant: National Science Foundation (NSF): Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP)

 

Due Date: December 9, 2013

Full Announcement Here

 

Targeted STEM Infusion Projects (TSIP) provides support toward achieving a short-term, well-defined goal that promises to improve the quality of undergraduate STEM education at an eligible institution. Targeted STEM Infusion Projects could, for example, enhance academic infrastructure by systematically adding traditional knowledge to the scope or content of a STEM course, updating curriculum, modernizing laboratory research equipment, or improving the computational network array for research and education. Catalyzing Opportunities for Research and Education (CORE) projects provide support for faculty members in STEM areas at TCUP-eligible institutions to pursue research locally or at an NSF-funded Center or other facility, a research-intensive institution, or a national laboratory. Awards are intended to help further the faculty member’s research capability and effectiveness, to improve research and teaching at his or her home institution, and to involve undergraduate students in research experiences. These awards are particularly appropriate as a means of recruiting and retaining highly qualified scientists, engineers, and educators at TCUP-eligible institutions.

 

Salish Kootenai College and Indigenous Math & Science Institute Awarded Grant to Develop Math Programs

PABLO — Salish Kootenai College (SKC), through the Indigenous Math & Science Institute (IMSI) secured a 5-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF), under the Tribal Colleges and Universities Program (TCUP), to develop two degree programs. The programs are a Bachelor’s degree in Mathematics Secondary Education and an Associate’s degree in Mathematical Science. Native Americans are vastly underrepresented in secondary mathematics teaching careers and in the attainment of advanced mathematics degrees in general. These new programs are designed to address this national shortage by graduating teachers and mathematicians that are grounded in Native culture.

 

Senator Jon Tester (D) MT supports the efforts lead by SKC. According to Tester, “Jobs in the future will rely on math and science, and we need to do a better job of preparing our students so they are ready to grow and strengthen our economy,” he further stated, “Salish Kootenai College is a leader in education, and their investment in our next generation of teachers, scientists, and engineers will boost Indian Country and Montana.”

 

The Indigenous Math & Science Institute provides a comprehensive suite of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) programs and services for Native Americans seeking careers in these disciplines. The ISMI team continually seeks collaborations with other research and education organizations to enhance opportunities for K-16 Native students locally, regionally, and nationally.

 

The National Science Foundation is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 “to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…” With an annual budget of about $7.0 billion (FY 2012), they are the funding source for approximately 20 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America’s colleges and universities. In many fields such as mathematics, computer science and the social sciences, NSF is the major source of federal backing. TCUP provides awards to Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaska Native-serving institutions, and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions to promote high quality STEM education, research, and outreach.

 

The Salish Kootenai College is a tribally controlled college, accredited as a Bachelor’s degree granting institution of higher learning located within the Flathead Indian Reservation. SKC was chartered in 1977 by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CS&KT). The mission of SKC is to provide quality postsecondary educational opportunities for Native Americans locally and throughout the United States.

For more information about this project, please contact: Steve Dupuis, Principal Investigator, Salish Kootenai College – PO Box 70, Pablo, MT 59855 – Telephone: (406) 275-4996 – email: steve_dupuis@skc.edu

 

Amherst College Library Acquires “Most Complete Collection” of Literature and History by Native Americans

Examining the Collection at the Frost Library

Amherst College’s Frost Library in Amherst, MA, has acquired the Pablo Eisenberg Collection of Native American Literature. The collection includes materials ranging from religious pamphlets published before the United States officially existed to first-edition novels by noted crime novelist Martin Cruz Smith, and is considered to be the most complete collection of Native American literature and history in existence. Read the whole story on Amherst’s site.